To Be A Kid

We’ve seen many ups and downs over the last few weeks. An increase of dosage for one of my son’s new medications brought back unwelcome side effects. His seizures are only slightly more under control than they were before, but he’s exhausted and has a hard time sleeping through the night. His mood and behavior have been bouncing around from stable and happy to angry and defiant.

When it’s at it’s worst, little incidents explode into big ones. The escalation is so fast that it’s jarring and catches us off-guard. It’s so fast and the situation is so frustrating that we don’t always respond in the best way. Then we find ourselves in the middle of the tornado. He’ll say mean things. He tells us he wants us to throw everything away and that he deserves it. I can sense the shame and guilt swell inside and overwhelm him. We hold him and tell him that we love him and wait for the storm to pass. When it does, there are usually tears and remorse and regret. As a father, these moments rip me apart.

These side effects are cruel, especially for someone his age. Between the side effects, the diet, the appointments, and the seizures, he has little time to be a kid. There aren’t many chances for him to be free, to make a mess, and to not have the complications of his life burden him. There aren’t many chances for us to let our guard down, either. We’re always on the edge worrying about him, trying to keep him safe and regulate these side effects. We’re as confined as he is.

But, sometimes, we find opportunities where we can all have fun and enjoy the moment. My son loves dressing up as Captain America, so my wife planned a Super Hero Scavenger Hunt for his birthday. He and his friends had to chase down the evil villain the Snake Robber, the role that I was taking on. The idea of running through the streets with a mask and stuffed snake around my neck made me anxious. I’m a shy, quiet, reserved individual that follows rules and avoids chaos. But I went into it with an open mind and the singular thought that it would make my son (and wife) happy.

I made my way to the location where the superhero party would encounter me for the first time. I waited nervously on a bench in the park while curious onlookers moved further away. Across the park, I saw one of the kids spot me and point in my direction. Then, they charged. Within a minute, they had covered me with Silly String and laughter. My son had a huge smile on his face as he and his friends chased me around the park. Then I used my freeze ray to, well, freeze them and escape to the next location.

epilepsy dad kid childhood seizure

I had a huge smile of my own on my face as I ran to set up the next battle. This time, the kids trapped me until I told them that I hid a dozen of their teddy bear friends in the park. While they looked for them, I escaped again. Eventually, they caught up with me and saw me entering my lair to assemble a machine to steal their powers.

In the final battle, the superheroes found me near the pool assembling my machine. I froze all the heroes again except for Captain America who used his shield to deflect the ray. He advanced on me while his friends watched and defeated me by pushing me into the pool.

epilepsy dad kid childhood seizure

As I laid in the pool, I looked up to see my son with the biggest smile on his face and his arms raised in victory. Behind us, I could hear his friends screaming and cheering him for him. Captain America had saved the day. At that moment, there were no side effects. No appointments. No seizures. There was just my son being happy. And being a kid.

epilepsy dad kid childhood seizure

Why I’m Running The Philadelphia Half Marathon 2017

Today, I’m re-sharing a post I did last year ahead of the Philadelphia Half Marathon. I’m running it again this year as part of the #AthletesVsEpilepsy team to raise awareness about epilepsy and to run for those that can’t. If you are looking for a way to support the Epilepsy Foundation or if you enjoy reading about our journey and want a way to show your support, please make a donation below.


I used to hate distance running. Growing up, I was a sprinter. The act of running was confined to short, powerful bursts, and it was over before my brain could register what was happening and commanded me to stop. That style of running served me well in sports and in getting away from my sister.

When I joined the Army, I knew there would be running but I felt misinformed as to how much running there would actually be. On the first morning at 0-dark-30, I discovered another level of distance running. I also learned that you could run up the same hill multiple times without ever running downhill. That experience challenged my sense of physics as well as my body every day for eight weeks. Filling up the rest of the day was running between buildings and tasks any time we were in a hurry and, in the Army, you’re always in a hurry. While the amount of running went down after basic training, there were still physical fitness tests that included a two-mile run at a pace that caused my lungs to burn. I wish had a fitness wearable to track all those miles. I would have rolled the digital odometer more than once.

When I left the Army, I couldn’t escape the running. I worked in an office of young, single twenty-somethings and there was always a 5K on the beach to support the whales, or the dolphins, or the turtles, or a 5K to support people that run 5Ks. After doing so many charity runs, I just kept running until running had become a core part of my workout routine.

I’m still not very good at it and it’s rare that I do a distance greater than a few miles, but the mental block that prevented my younger brain from enjoying the experience seems to have faded and my 5-mile jog along the water in Seattle has become a favorite tradition when I visit.

Five miles, though, is considerably shorter than the 13.1 miles that I’ll need to do to cross the finish line in November. When I think about how far I will have to run, I get nervous. When I look at the calendar and when I see that there are only a few weeks left, I get discouraged and negative. There’s not enough time left to train. I can’t do this. I start to question my life choices. Well, at least the one about signing up for the event.

Why, then, did I sign up?

Sometimes after a hard run, maybe it felt longer or I stopped more times than I wanted to, those fears and doubts come rushing in. But as I painfully climb my way up the four steps to our apartment, when I use whatever energy I have left to push the door open, I’ll hear “Daddy, how was your run?”

No matter how far I ran or how hard it was, I’m instantly energized. I don’t think about the pain or the negativity or the nerves. I think about my son and why I am running.

My son wakes up every day and takes a handful of pills. He may have already had a few seizures that disturbed his sleep. He has to will himself to get ready for school. He eats his high fat, mayonnaise, and soy flour donuts and drinks his vitamins that sometimes upset his stomach. The drugs kick in and his brain swims in mind-altering medicine. His school is crowded, loud, and hard, but he walks through those doors and up those stairs and waves back at us as he passes through the glass atrium with a smile.

epilepsy dad half marathon philly athletes

I’m running for my son. I’m running for that smile. I wanted to do something hard because he runs a marathon every day. I want to see my son at the finish line and tell him that I did it for him.

The World Outside

I’m lying in bed next to my son who I haven’t seen all week. With my right hand on my laptop, I reach my left hand over and rest it on his back, making sure he is still there. I can feel his breathing, my hand rising and falling with each of his breaths.

On the other side of him is my wife, who I was also missing. The last few weeks have been a whirlwind. A new job. A new house. A new school year for my son. A new medication for his seizures. A new outlook. A new focus.

With so many changes going on, I’d been so consumed with my life that I hadn’t looked up to see the world outside. When I finally did, I wished I hadn’t. The world kept turning. Things kept happening. Hurricanes, mass shootings, fear, and hatred. Human beings being cruel to each other and using their power to silence their victims. It seemed that the world had been uglier than usual in the time that I’ve been away. I felt both selfish and grateful to be away from it. To not experience it. To not get involved. To focus on my life and to shut out the world.

But that couldn’t last. The world seeped in, overflowing an already stressed situation. The combined strain tested the strength of that connection to my anchor. Our stressful lives during a chaotic time in an especially cruel world. Survival became about pursuing the path of least resistance. It was easier to hide from the world than it was to be a part of it. It was easier to not write than it was to write. It was easier to use the excuse of being too busy in life to avoid being a real part of it.

I pushed myself away from the world but I had nowhere to go. My family is my anchor, and I was thousands of miles away in every meaning of that phrase. A cross-country trip that followed added physical distance to the emotional. But on the plane ride back, I could feel the weight of the last few weeks lifting. The world in conflict sped below me as I looked out the window from a familiar, distant perspective. But it wasn’t the world I was eager to get back to. It was my family that was pulling me back, and I couldn’t get to them fast enough.

And so here I am, restlessly lying in bed next to my family in our new home. My obligations to our new life and the workday ahead steal my focus. But my son’s breath serves as a metronome that brings my attention back to this room. The cadence of his breathing and the rising and falling of my hand on his chest connect me to him. I find my wife’s hand in the same place, so we’re all connected together once again. The world outside and my insecurity conspire to keep the attention of my head and my heart. In this moment, though, I know that it will be my family that gets me through.