Wall Of Limitations

This summer, my son participated in a week-long baseball camp. We knew it would be physically demanding so we spoke with the coaches before we registered him to make sure that he could rest and leave early if he needed it. It’s a phone call we have made before and will likely make many times in the future that serves two purposes. First, it helps us make sure that our son will be safe. And second, it identifies any places not willing to make accommodations for people who need them, which is not a place we want to be.

My son’s nanny took him on the first day and the coaches welcomed him to the camp. He managed to stay for half the day but then took a three-hour nap when he got home. But he had fun and he made friends. The second day was much the same with a long nap after a shortened day.

By the third day, he didn’t want to go. He was noticeably tired but he managed to make it out the door. His nanny coaxed him on to the field and, after almost thirty minutes, one of the coaches managed to finally get my son to participate. He left early again that day.

On the last day of camp, we planned to let him stay all day because they were going to play a game. His nanny made sure he took frequent breaks and he made it through the day and finished the camp with a smile.

The end of the camp coincided with the Little League World Series. I watched the grueling tournament and wondered, given how the camp went, whether my son could do anything like that. By now, I don’t have any grand vision of him playing in the major leagues, but I do want him to continue to play something that gives him joy and that makes him feel like a part of a team.

It made me think that someday we’re going to run into a wall of limitations. We’ve faced small ones before, but we’ve managed to pass them mostly by watching our son climb over them. We’ve managed to keep our distance from larger walls by adjusting our path. We swapped hockey for baseball. We learned to work around his physical and endurance issues. But we haven’t been faced with consciously confronting the difference between possibility and probability. Potential versus practical. Fantasy versus reality. We haven’t faced the wall that was once on the horizon but is now uncomfortably close.

And every day we are moving closer. It’s starting to block our view to the world behind it. I’m beginning to wonder what we will do when we reach it. Will it be too big and stop us in our tracks? Will it be too overwhelming and send us back the way we came? Or will we do what we have always done and follow our son as he finds a way to climb it, even though we know there will be an even bigger wall behind this one?

Happy Anniversary, Epilepsy

Four years ago this week, my son had his first seizure.

Four years.

Almost half his life.

He doesn’t remember the time before. Most days, neither do I. Our memories are of our new life that started the night his body contorted and stiffened on the floor of the arcade. It was the night that time stopped as we prayed that our son would come back to us and when I held his frozen body in a thunderstorm waiting for the ambulance to arrive.

Even though his second seizure wouldn’t be for nearly two months, the fear and uncertainty that the first one had caused lingered. It turned out that time was the quiet before the storm…that feeling you get when the clouds darken and the air changes and you know the storm is close. The air filled with the same electricity that would soon wreak havoc on my son’s developing brain.

And then it happened. The second seizure burst free just as my son sat in his seat onboard an airplane. Another thirty minutes and the plane would have been in the air but, thankfully, the crew got him safely off the plane and on his way to the children’s hospital. Within a few months, his seizures would be out of control and we’d be back in the same hospital learning firsthand what status epilepticus was.

It would take nearly two years before my son was stable. But even then, we were still adjusting medication, dealing with side effects and behavioral issues, and occasionally using his rescue medication. He was stable, but not living the life we had planned. But by then we were beginning to realize that we needed a new plan.

Four years in, we’re still adjusting that plan. There hasn’t been a day that has not been affected by epilepsy. He’s had countless seizures. He’s been on and off medications and suffered endless side effects. He’s had a barrage of blood draws, EEGs, and other testing and had a myriad of therapies trying to restore what epilepsy had taken away. He’s been isolated from his peers and falling more behind in a world that doesn’t wait for people who can’t keep up, or are different, or need help.

After four years, I thought we’d be further along. I hoped he would outgrow his seizures or we’d at least have them under control. I thought we would have figured it all out. I thought we’d be able to get back to normal. But, instead, we had to change our definition of “normal” and learn how to live life with different expectations.

In these four years, I’ve learned a lot of other things, too. I think I am a better man, husband, and father than I was before this started. And we’ve had so many wonderful experiences and met some amazing people on our journey. But I can’t bring myself to be grateful. I can’t allow myself to acknowledge the things that are good because I don’t want to reward the monster that continues to attack my son. Our life is what it is in spite of epilepsy, not because of it.

Four years is a long time. But I know we have many years to go. We didn’t ask for this, and we don’t want it. But it looks like we’re going to be together for a while.

So, Happy Anniversary, Epilepsy.

I didn’t get you anything.

Because I hate you.

No Free Lunch

Early one morning, I was sitting in the living room writing when I heard my son leave his room and go in to the bathroom. He was in there longer than usual and I could hear the muffled sound of banging. After a few more minutes, he came out of the bathroom and I asked what had happened. He explained that he was washing the bucket we had given him the night before when he told us he had an upset stomach. He had thrown up in the middle of the night.

This wasn’t the first time this had happened. My son has been on the ketogenic diet for more than two years. The “keto” diet is a high-fat diet used to treat hard to control epilepsy and it’s hard on his stomach. In addition to his seizure medication, the diet forces him to also take vitamin supplements and medicine for reflux, constipation, and acidosis. Constipation, diarrhea, cramping, and vomiting have been frequent visitors since my son was on the diet.

It’s not only hard on his body, it’s hard mentally, too. He can’t eat what we do or, if he does, he has to have a shot of oil or some other fat on the side. And he generally can’t have more of any one thing without adding more oil. He can’t have a slice of pizza. He can’t have a bowl of cereal or a bag of chips. When he’s at a birthday party, he can’t have a piece of cake or candy. We make modifications, like bringing along a “keto cupcake”, but it’s not the same. Because he is who he is, he endures with little complaint.

We make a handful of meals that he likes where the fat is hidden in the recipe. A soy flour and mayonnaise crust for pizza is one of his favorites. With that, there is fat in the crust and oil mixed in with the tomato sauce so he doesn’t need to have oil on the side. But we don’t have many of those meals, so we’ve been repeating the ones we do have for months.

To add dietary variety, the doctors want him to eat more “real” food. But for that we need a source of fat, which is generally a oil. And that’s what we did for dinner the night before that led to the bucket and the early morning cleanup.

We’ve lowered his ratio over the last year so that he needs less fat, but his diet is still more fat than not. I want to get him off the diet completely, but the doctors say it is working. It’s not enough to stop his seizures, but they think it’s helping his overall brain function and raising his seizure threshold higher than it would be off the diet. I’m less convinced, but I’m also the one that sees how hard the diet is for him every day. And there are certain rights of passage with food that I went through as a child. Eating an entire box of Lucky Charms. Folding a real piece of pizza in half and devouring it. Trying things at the farmer’s market. He’s missing out on all of it.

There is an acronym I remember from my economics classes that was also used in the Robert A. Heineken story The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress. TANSTAAFL, or “there ain’t no such thing as a free lunch,” is the idea that you can’t get something for nothing.

When we started the diet, we saw it as an alternative to more seizure medicine. It was supposed to be the prescription that helped his seizures without the side effects. It was supposed to give him a better quality of life. Maybe compared to another pharmaceutical, it did. But it didn’t come without its own downside.

Because everything comes at a price.